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Confirmation Day


Confirmation
from Wikipedia, the free encclopedia

Confirmation is a rite in many Christian Churches.

Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox Churches, and a large portion of Anglicans, view it as a sacrament, which in the East is conferred on infants immediately after baptism, but in the West is usually administered later.

According to canon law for the Latin or Western Catholic Church, the sacrament is to be conferred on the faithful at about the age of discretion (generally taken to be about 7), unless the Episcopal Conference has decided on a different age, or there is danger of death or, in the judgement of the minister, a grave reason suggests otherwise (canon 891 of the Code of Canon Law). The number of Episcopal Conferences that have set a later age has diminished in recent decades, and even in those countries a bishop may not refuse to confer the sacrament on younger children who request it, provided they are baptized, have the use of reason, are suitably instructed and are properly disposed and able to renew the baptismal promises (letter of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments published in its 1999 bulletin, pages 537-540).

In Protestant Churches, the rite tends to be seen rather as a mature statement of faith by an already baptised person, usually an adolescent, and thus as a rite of passage, which, though not as big a change as a bar mitzvah or bat mitzvah, holds a similar meaning.

Several secular, mainly Humanist, organizations direct "civil confirmations" for older children, as a statement of their life stance, an equivalent alternative to traditional religious ceremonies for children of that age.

Some regimes have as a matter of policy fostered the replacement of Christian rituals such as confirmation with non-religious ones. In the historically mainly Protestant German Democratic Republic (East Germany), for example, "the Jugendweihe (youth dedication) gradually supplanted the Christian practice of Confirmation." The Jugendweihe, a concept that first appeared in 1852, is described as "a solemn initiation marking the transition from youth to adulthood that was developed in opposition to Protestant and Catholic Churches' Confirmation."


Confirmation Articles

Catholic Confirmation | Catholic Confirmation Gifts | Catholic Confirmation Name Change | Catholic Confirmation Online | Sacrament of Confirmation in the Catholic Church | Free Ware Catholic Confirmation Study Material


Catholic Confirmation Name Change


CATHOLIC CONFIRMATION NAME CHANGE

The practice of a Catholic confirmation name change was not limited to baptism. Many medieval examples show that any notable change of condition, especially in the spiritual order, was often accompanied by the reception of a new name. In the eighth century the two Englishmen Winfrith and Willibald going on different occasions to Rome received from the reigning pontiff, along with a new commission to preach, the names respectively of Boniface and Clement. So again Emma of Normandy when she married King Ethelred in 1002 took the name Ælfgifu; while, of course, the reception of a new name upon entering a religious order is almost universal even in our day. It is not strange, then, that at confirmation, in which the interposition of a godfather emphasizes the resemblance with baptism, it should have become customary to take a new name, though usually no great use is made of it. In one case, however, that of Henry III, King of France -- who being the godson of our English Edward VI had been christened Edouard Alexandre in 1551 -- the same French prince at confirmation received the name of Henri, and by this he afterwards reigned. Even in England the practice of adopting a new name at confirmation was remembered after the Reformation, for Sir Edward Coke declares that a man might validly buy land by his confirmation name, and he recalls the case of a Sir Francis Gawdye, late Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, whose name of baptism was Thomas and his name of confirmation Francis (Co. Litt. 3a).

Source of Catholic confirmation name change article from Catholic Encyclopedia.

Choosing a patron saint for Confirmation

During the Confirmation ceremony, the Bishop addresses each candidate by their "Confirmation Name". This may be your existing baptismal name if this is the name of a saint.

Most candidates choose a new Confirmation name and this also must be the name of a saint. The important thing is that you know something about the saint and pray to that saint for help and guidance.

A name in the family

In countries with a strong Catholic tradition, some names have become very popular and may be popular in your family. If you want to take such a name, it is a good opportunity to find out about the saint and the traditions associated with him or her. Sometimes, these may be saints about whom little is known historically.

Common names

If you choose a name such as John, James, Catherine or Maria, you should know which saint you are choosing - there are many Saints called by these names.

Starting from scratch

A good way to start is to find a book in the library or to look up a list of saints on the Internet and find a saint whose life you find interesting and attractive.

Men and Women

A question that gets asked every year is "Can a girl choose for her Confirmation patron a saint who was a man rather than a woman?" The answer is "Yes".

It's not usually asked whether a boy could choose a saint who was a woman but that would be all right, too.



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